Social Studies Department

Chair:

Dr. Paul Wittekind

Faculty:

Mr. Dave Feichtner
Ms. Betsy Moore
Ms. Alexandra Pacak

Courses:


Honors World History

.5 Credit      Semester

This course traces the development of humanity from the Enlightenment to the present day. Emphasis is placed upon the political, economic, and social development of the various civilizations, especially those comprising our Western heritage. The course will include a strong emphasis on writing.


CP World History

.5 Credit      Semester

This course traces the development of humanity from the Enlightenment to the present day. Emphasis is placed upon the political, economic, and social development of the various civilizations, especially those comprising our Western heritage. The course will include a strong emphasis on writing.


World History

.5 Credit      Semester

This course traces the development of humanity from the Enlightenment to the present day. Emphasis is placed upon the political, economic, and social development of the various civilizations, especially those comprising our Western heritage. This course will emphasize writing while also emphasizing basic social studies skills.


AP® United States Government and Politics

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisites: World History and TR

This year-long course in United States Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes, as well as basic concepts of personal financial literacy. The course will also prepare students to take the AP® United States Government and Politics exam.


CP U.S. Government and Politics

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisite: World History

This one-semester course is an examination of the structure and workings of the government of the United States. It is designed to educate students about the history of the American government, federalism, the Bill of Rights, the three branches of government, and important documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Students will also examine rulings of the U.S. Supreme Court, analyze political cartoons, and explicate articles concerning government issues. Students will also briefly examine state and local government as well as basic concepts of personal financial literacy. This class will include a strong emphasis on writing.


U.S. Government and Politics

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisite: World History

This one-semester course is an examination of the structure and workings of the government of the United States. It is designed to educate students about the history of the American government, federalism, the Bill of Rights, the three branches of government, and important documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Students will also briefly examine state and local government as well as basic concepts of personal financial literacy.


AP® United States History

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisites: AP® United States Government and Politics and TR

AP® United States History is an introduction to American civilization from the age of exploration and colonization through late twentieth century American history. The course focuses on central themes and issues in the development of American growth, institutional change, cultural development, and political democracy as Americans faced them in the past. The advanced placement class is intended to be an intense, analytical study of the events that have helped to shape our nation. Students who take this class are expected to earn college credit by passing the AP® U.S. History exam with a score of 3 or higher.


CP American History

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisite: American Government

CP American History is an introduction to American civilization from the age of exploration and colonization through late twentieth century American history. The course focuses on central themes and issues in the development of American growth, institutional change, cultural development, and political democracy as Americans faced them in the past. The class will include a strong emphasis on writing.


American History

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisite: American Government

American History is an introduction to American civilization from the age of exploration and colonization through late twentieth century American history. The course focuses on central themes and issues in the development of American growth, institutional change, cultural development, and political democracy as Americans faced them in the past.


AP® Macroeconomics

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisites: AP® United States Government and Politics/CP American Government and TR

This course will give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.


Economics

.5 Credit      Semester      Pre-requisites: American History

The goal of this one-semester class is to teach students financial literacy skills. Students learn a five-step process that they can use in making informed personal choices in the marketplace, the voting booth, and their personal lives. Students then extend this cost/benefit decision making process to government and economic systems including capitalism, socialism, communism, and government-assisted capitalism. The course explains microeconomics and supply and demand in terms of the choices made by individual consumers and producers in the marketplace. Finally, the course explains macroeconomics in terms of the choices made by the whole economy, as reflected in aggregate demand and supply. Topics explored include GDP, unemployment, inflation, the money supply, the banking system, and monetary, tax and fiscal policy.


AP® World History

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisite: TR

AP® World History is structured around the investigation of five course themes and 19 key concepts in six different chronological periods, from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. The course is designed to prepare students for the AP® World History exam.


AP® Psychology

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisites: TR, open to grades 11-12

The AP® Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.


Psychology I

.5 Credit      Semester      Open to grades 11-12

Psychology I is a survey course centering on the social implications of psychology versus the biological. Central themes of the course include principles of learning, abnormal behavior, gender roles, states of consciousness, therapies, group and social forces on behavior, and personality theories.


CP Psychology II

.5 Credit      Semester      Pre-requisites: Psychology I and TR Open to grades 11-12

Psychology II is a course for highly motivated students who desire more insight in the field of Psychology. Biological implications such has the functions of the brain and cognitive development are major themes of the course.


Cincinnati History

.5 Credit      Semester      Open to grades 11-12

Cincinnati has a rich history and culture. This course will present students with the opportunity to research, study, and present information about various people, places, and events associated with the “Queen City.” After a general survey of introductory presentations and facts about related topics, students will be expected to do further research and make appropriate in-depth presentations.


Movies on American History

.5 Credit      Semester      Open to grades 11-12

This semester-long elective in history will cover the major themes and events in American History from the 1870s through today. Students will analyze how Hollywood depicts events in American History and how those perspectives have changed over time.


Democracy Now!

.5 Credit      Semester      Open to grades 11-12

This class will study and explore the 2016 election. Students will be tasked with creating a political rally for Roger Bacon, “campaigning for their candidate” during flex, and ultimately creating a voting system for RB students to “vote” for their candidate to elect a president. After the election students will analyze current political events while formulating an opinion and predicting how the elected president will act on such issues.


Comparative Governments

.5 Credit      Semester      Open to grades 11-12

In this class students will be asked to analyze the government in Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, and that of the United States and other countries. Students will then compare and contrast the governments of each while evaluating their effectiveness. Finally students will create their own form of government, which they believe is the best form.


Modern Terrorism

.5 Credit      Semester      Open to grades 11-12

Students will explore themes of terrorism from circa 1900 to the present day with an emphasis on September 11th . Students will analyze events using both primary and secondary sources to evaluate meaning and significance while judging how both are constantly evolving.