Science Department

Science Department

Chair:

Mrs. Sara Russell

Faculty:

Mr. Bill Braselton
Bro. Chris Cahill OFM
Mr. Jacob Cheesman
Mrs. Joleen Gardner
Mr. Kyle Monahan
Mr. Michael Wiegand

Courses:


Honors Biology

1 Credit      Year

This course investigates the composition, diversity, complexity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Fundamental concepts of heredity and evolution provide a framework through inquiry-based instruction to explore the living world, the physical environment and the interactions within and between them. Quarterly projects will be a part of this class.


CP Biology

1 Credit      Year

This course investigates the composition, diversity, complexity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Fundamental concepts of heredity and evolution provide a framework through inquiry-based instruction to explore the living world, the physical environment and the interactions within and between them. Quarterly projects will be a part of this class.


Biology

1 Credit      Year

This course investigates the composition, diversity, complexity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Fundamental concepts of heredity and evolution provide a framework through inquiry-based instruction to explore the living world, the physical environment and the interactions within and between them. Quarterly projects will be a part of this class.


Honors Chemistry

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisite: Honors Biology

This is designed for the students in the Honors program. Subjects emphasized include atomic theory and its influence on bonding, the periodic table, chemical nomenclature, ionic charge and oxidation numbers, chemical/physical changes, chemical equations, molar conversions, stoichiometry, phases of matter, gas laws, solubility, acid & bases, and nuclear chemistry. There is extensive lab work to support and illustrate information presented in lecture.


CP Chemistry

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisites: CP Biology and Algebra I

This course includes atomic theory and history, atomic bonding, the periodic table, chemical nomenclature, ionic charge and oxidation numbers, chemical/physical changes, chemical equations, molar conversions, stoichiometry, phases of matter, gas laws, solubility, acid & bases, and nuclear chemistry. There is lab work and demonstrations to give students hands-on experience.


Materials Science

1 Credit      Year

Materials science is a discipline that links applied chemistry directly to useful products. The content of the course introduces some basic chemistry concepts but focuses mostly on content in the areas of solids, metals, polymers, ceramics and glasses, composites, electronic materials, and nanotechnology. The content of the course has been developed with materials/support from ASM International, one of the largest technological/scientific communities focusing on metals, polymers, and ceramics. Lab work and demonstrations are included.


CP Physics

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisite: CP Chemistry

This course investigates physical laws and theories, relationships of physical phenomena, and the relationships of physics to other fields. It will familiarize students with the principles of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics. Demonstrations and labs will be incorporated to reinforce understanding. The class will focus on the conceptual understanding of physics with mathematical applications.


AP® Biology

1 Credit      Year     Pre-requisites: Honors/CP Biology and TR

AP® Biology is a second year course in Biology and follows the curriculum specified by the College Board. The course will cover molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. Laboratory experience is an essential part of the AP® curriculum.


AP® Chemistry

1 Credit      Year

Pre-requisites: Honors/CP Chemistry and TR AP® Chemistry reviews all basic concepts in chemistry, but focusing on more in-depth investigation/information on atomic theory, atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical equilibria, stoichiometry, electrochemistry, acid/base chemistry, redox reactions, solubility, gas laws, chemical thermodynamics, organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, reaction prediction, chemical nomenclature, and VSEPR theory. There is extensive lab work to support and illustrate information presented in class. This course follows the curriculum specified by the College Board.


AP® Physics I

1 Credit      Year     Pre-requisites: Honors/CP Chemistry and TR

This class is designed for students who wish to investigate physical laws and theories, relationships of physical phenomena, and the interrelationships of physics to other fields. AP® Physics 1 will familiarize students with the principles of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics. It will show the value of experimentation and mathematics in the development of laws and theories in physics and teach the basic skills of problem-solving and scientific thinking in the area of physics. The mathematical emphasis of this course prepares students for college level physics.


AP® Physics II

1 Credit      Year      Pre-requisite: CP Physics/AP® Physics I

This course provides an introduction to both classical and modern physics. AP® Physics II is a second year physics course that will prepare the student for the AP® Physics II exam. This non-calculus, college-level physics course will cover Newtonian mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, sound, optics, electricity, magnetism, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and relativity. Students will build upon their first year of Physics in High School and delve more deeply into everyday problems that confront scientists and engineers. This course follows the curriculum specified by the College Board.


CP Anatomy & Physiology: Cellular

CP Anatomy & Physiology: Systematic

.5 Credit ea.      Semester      Pre-requisite: Honors/CP Biology

The Anatomy & Physiology courses are designed for those who think they may like to have a career in the health fields or who simply want to know more about how the body works. Anatomy covers the structures within the body, while physiology covers the functions of those structures. A student may take one of these semester-long courses without taking the other, but most students get more out of both classes when taken close together. Both courses include dissections, group activities, lab activities, lecture, and class discussion.


Invertebrate Zoology

.5 Credit      Semester      Pre-requisite: "C" or better in Biology

Invertebrate Zoology is a semester-long survey course of the invertebrates in the animal kingdom. Animal characteristics, classification, anatomy, behavior, and development are the major topics that will be discussed. The Phyla include: Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelmithes, Nemertea, Nematoda, Mollusca, Annelida, Arthropoda, & Echinodermata. The class will include labs, hands-on activities, dissections, class discussion, projects, and lecture. Students may take Zoology courses in any order or may take one without taking the other.


Vertebrate Zoology

.5 Credit      Semester      Pre-requisite: "C" or better in Biology

Vertebrate Zoology is a semester-long survey course of the vertebrates in the animal kingdom. Animal characteristics, classification, anatomy, behavior, and development are the major topics that will be discussed. The topics covered include the vertebrate chordates: Osteichthyes, Chondrichthyes, Agnatha, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves, & Mammalia. The class will include labs, hands-on activities, dissections, class discussion, projects, and lecture. Students may take Zoology courses in any order &/or may take one without taking the other.


Engineering I

.5 Credit      Semester      Pre-requisite: Geometry

This course describes the field of engineering and engineering technology, allowing students to explore technology systems and design processes. Through the course students will use math, science, technology, and writing to solve engineering problems. The course is primarily project-based and requires substantial participation by all students. The course also emphasizes teamwork, oral and written communication, and the impact technology has on society. This is the first course in a two semester sequence. The first semester can be taken without taking the second semester.


Engineering II

.5 Credit      Semester      Pre-requisite: Geometry

This is a continuation of Engineering I. The course describes the field of engineering and engineering technology, allowing students to explore technology systems and design processes. Through the course students will use math, science, technology, and writing to solve engineering problems. The course is primarily project-based and requires substantial participation by all students. The course also emphasizes teamwork, oral and written communication, and the impact technology has on society. This is the second course in a two semester sequence.


Astronomy

.5 Credit      Semester

This course is a scientific exploration of the human place in the universe. This course covers the origin and history of the Universe and the formation of the Earth and the solar system. It also compares the Earth's properties with those of the other planets and explores how the heavens have influenced human thought and action. This course includes study of the properties of light and matter and the tools astronomers use to measure radiation from celestial sources. The course also covers exciting contemporary topics such as black holes, the expansion of the universe, and the search for extraterrestrial life. Although largely descriptive, the course will occasionally require the use of basic mathematics.


3-D Design

.5 Credit      Semester      Open to grades 11-12

In this guided, project based class, students will learn to design objects in 3D design software and have the opportunity to print them with the 3D printer. Designs will start basic and will progress to more detail oriented projects. Students will be expected to create at least four designs each quarter


Biodiversity

.5 Credit      Semester      Pre-requisite: Biology

This class will investigate the source of biological diversity and interspecies dynamics in a wide variety of biomes. Students will investigate the effect of various biotic and abiotic influences, including interspecies relationships and human influences on the fitness of individual species. They will further analyze the ecological impact of species on their own habitats. Students who complete this class will acquire a comprehensive understanding of the importance of biodiversity on the health of ecosystems.


Ethics in Science

.5 Credit      Semester

The purpose of this course is to engage students in reading about, considering, and discussing the responsible conduct of science. Student objectives will include learning the purpose and value of ethical decision-making, having a positive disposition toward continued learning about research ethics, and investigating current science situations.